Medicine Rattles and Our Future

The healing journey may begin with ourselves, but unless it extends outwards towards our homes, our communities, our ecosystem, and our biosphere any healing we achieve can not last….–Harvest McCampbell

I can’t remember exactly how it was I came across Harvest McCampbell’s inspiring book (which is also a very helpful resource) Food Security & Sustainability: For The Times Ahead, but I am sure glad I did, became her friend on facebook, and had the opportunity to meet her last year. Her extensive knowledge of all kinds of plants and their medicinal abilities for healing both humankind and the earth, and her open nature have really given me a lot of hope and inspiration over the past couple years. Whenever I have a question about soil, compost, healing and even history she is available. I personally don’t know how she does it, as I know she has a large following on facebook, and that she manages to keep up with all of us!

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Guerrilla Garden Slideshow I

The revenge of the Bean Bandits and Pirate Tomatoes is upon us! I finally found a good spot on one of the Greenways of Vancouver BC. No one was using it, it got good sun and was just by a sky-train and rail-road tracks so it seemed a perfect spot. There is a lot more space available in this area,…

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Food Security & Sustainability

Spider Web

Food Security & Sustainability: For The Times Ahead by Harvest McCampbell, published by Bio Diverse Press in May 2008 arrived just in time.

This book is a level headed and comprehensive look at what is coming our way. Without fear-mongering and trying to get rich off of your fears, Harvest McCampbell provides a wealth of resources and practical steps that you can take to prepare for the transition that our world is gearing up for.

Harvest shares her vision of a Green World that her Grandmother passed down to her, and makes us consider how we would survive if we woke up one day in a world without asphalt or cars. In this book Harvest shares her answers to the question her Gram used to ask her when they were out in the woods gathering wild food and herbs.

“Maybe today, maybe when we get back to where we left the car, there will be no car, there will be no roads. Then what will we do Little One?”

In a few simple paragraphs, Harvest McCampbell filled my head with visions of the Green World her Gram spoke of and my heart with a secure feeling of hope. This book points to how we can each help each other to find our way through the mess we have made of things by working together with respect and confidence.

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Preparing for War with the Bankocracy

Published in Far West Almanac July, 2009. Follow-up to the article: For Generation X Eyes Only.

Any political, economic, theological, or philosophical system that in practice rewards production over life is illegitimate because, tautologically enough, it does not value the lives of its citizens over the needs of production. Such is sufficient to define illegitimacy. No other measure is needed.

Derrick JensonA Language Older Than Words -p368-369

burmadump

By now it will have sunk in good and deep that my previous proposal to stage a debt repayment strike for just one month in September (09/09) [see article Gen X mentioned above] is impractical unless enough people get involved so that we cannot be ignored. Otherwise simply not paying a debt for a month will result in late charges, bouncing checks and other never-before-heard-of fees. For the first people throwing off this yoke of debt and refusing to be suckered by the Currency Controlling Witch-Doctors of the Apocalyptic Future its gonna have to be all or nothing.

Anyone considering such a step needs to think long and hard about their options. This is not the easy way out of your debt. It is a much harder road to take and will demand much personal sacrifice. For those who owe J.P. Morgan Chase, for example, feel no guilt for refusing to pay this debt. Realize it may be necessary to stop paying the debt permanently, and that this will most likely result in garnished wages and a bad credit history.

When considering such a drastic step, be aware that there are many ways to deal with this issue. Many people are having success by negotiating lower payments for bills and debts. Such alternatives are better options for people with kids or health conditions. For those of us who understand that we are at war with these bankers and don’t want to give them another cent, it is time to consider more direct action.

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Guerrilla Gardening by the Skytrain

Hidasta beanAfter waiting for residency for more than a year, wondering how much longer I would be an illegitimate person was starting to wear on me. But, as they say, when the planets are in line everything falls into place. The full rose moon of June 7th, 2009 was such a day. I finally got my Canadian residency so that night I planted 13 Hidasta Shield Figure Pole beans (from The Cottage Gardener) to give my thanks to Vancouver, BC for welcoming and accepting us.

The previous year I had spent a lot of time walking the nearby streets admiring everyone’s fantastic gardens. I finally found the perfect spot on one of the Greenways of Vancouver. No one was using it, it got good sun and was just by a sky-train and rail-road tracks so it seemed a perfect spot. There is a lot more space available in this area, although much of it is under the tracks and wouldn’t get any rain.

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Thoughts on Guerrilla Gardening

Reclaimed GreenspaceThere are as many ways to guerrilla garden as there are stars in the sky, and that is the best thing about it. The best way to do it is your way and to just get started. Many people love to make seed bombs and drop them as a group, other people love sneaking privately about the city — planting plots. Some people like to be highly organized — others random and without a thought. The main thing that holds it all together is that we are people reclaiming the land around us, reaching out and getting involved, hanging around and making sure that it grows, and grows and is a pleasure for all who pass by.

I have recently started reading the book The One-Straw Revolution by Masanobu Fukuoka and his natural farming methods have astonished me and made me rethink what little I thought I knew about growing plants. I was already familiar with Rudolf Steiner’s methods of biodynamic farming, yet even so this book has been a real mind-opener.

Although I have been planting things in random places for a few years I haven’t had a chance to really take over a piece of land in an urban setting until this year. I spent much of last year walking the streets around my area checking out pieces of land. I didn’t want it to be too far from where we live in case it didn’t rain much and I had to haul water every day. I didn’t want it next to a main road to avoid the pollution from car exhaust, and I wanted it to get plenty of sun and rain. I finally found a good spot on the Greenway under the skytrain and next to the train tracks not too far from our apartment.

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A Question for Vegetarians

I have a question I have always wanted to ask a few vegetarians, and perhaps this is a good place to finally do so…

Is there that much difference between an animal and a plant?

Rhubarb

In recent years, and especially after reading Stephen Harrod Bruhner’s book The Secret Teaching of Plants, Derrick Jensen’s book, A Language Older Than Words and learning more from other Earth poets and students of Nature who read her book through direct and conscious experience such as Goethe and Thoreau, this distinction has become less and less clear to me. When a plant is eaten it is sacrificing its own body so that we can live, it is the same with an animal.

Currently both plants and animals are being horribly abused, disfigured and treated inhumanely, we think of cows stuffed into factory farms or of lab rats being experimented on to further the development of new drugs but there are also vast green deserts of genetically manipulated soy, and all the other terrible things we do to plants in the name of science and feeding the world. It does make me sad that the poor underdog, plants, have no Vegetation Activists to protect and defend them from these disrespectful and abusive attitudes. But I suppose it is even worse for rocks and minerals that are considered to have absolutely no personality.

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The Heart of Maizeland

Article published in the Far West Almanac May 2008. Inspired by the book SELU: Seeking the Corn-Mother's Wisdom by Marilou Awiakta Ginitsi Selu (Grandmother Corn) Harmony, Respect, Community, Healing Lately when I find myself thinking about roots, it isn't long until I start thinking about corn. Edible corn originated in Central America, a gift of the creator in the form…

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A Language Older Than Words

"Fearing death, fearing life, fearing love, and fearing most of all the loss of control, we create social rules and institutions that mirror our fears and reinforce our destructive behaviors."

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