Fermentation

Carrot Kanji – Traditional Punjabi Fermented Drink

carrot-kanji-recipe

Source: www.vegrecipesofindia.com Visit that website to see beautiful step-by-step photos of how to make this recipe.

Gajar kanji or carrot kanji is a traditional Punjabi fermented drink made in winter. Black (purple) carrots appear in the winters in Northern India and give the kanji its characteristic purple color. If you don’t have black carrots, adding beetroot gives this rich dark purple color. You can also add some turnips to the kanji if you like.

Kanji is made with simple ingredients – carrots, mustard powder, red chilli powder and black salt along with water. The mustard added to the kanji helps keep the body warm in the chilly winters of the north.

GAPS™ Milkshake for Constipation

GAPs smoothie

Dr. Campbell-McBride has invented the GAPS milkshakes for a multitude of situations. One of these it is especially recommended for is constipation. Juice stimulates bile production.

A GAPS milkshake is a combination of juice blended with raw eggs and a healthy dollop of fermented cream (sour cream). Initially begin with about 1/2 cup a day and work up to 2 cups a day. Sensitive people may want to begin with even less.

The high fat content of sour cream lubricates the bowel wall and softens the stool.

It is easy to make you own sour cream, simply innoculate a pint (500ml) of (preferable raw) cream with 2 tablespoons of kefir, yogurt or creme fraiche.
Let this mixture sit on the counter for 24 hours, and you will have your own homemade probiotic rich sour cream.

Dr. Campbell-McBride recommends using carrot juice as a base for your juices, it is good to have the juice as clear as possible, especially at the beginning of the diet when your digestive system is very sensitive to raw fibre.

To this you can add a green apple and other therapeutic ingredients, such as ginger, celery, cucumber, carrot tops, mint, lettuces, beet and radish tops, bok choy, cabbage, etc.

Raw Yogurt Herbal Facial Cleanser

7 creamy cleanser ready to use!

This is a lovely recipe from one of our local cowshare family – Heather Passmore is an amazing artist who has the ability to turn lemons into lemonade as you will see from this selection of some of her cool artwork: Rejection, Revised. Try out this recipe and you will have a chance to try a bit of her amazing creative artistry to cleanse your face. As many of you know, Cleopatra used to love taking fermented horse milk baths as the enzymes and probiotics in the fermented milk rejuvenated her skin preventing wrinkles and aging effects.

Raw Yogurt Herbal Facial Cleanser:

Instead of spending lots of money on facial cleansing cream that contains no cream and many preservatives, I simply use the following recipe which I created over a period of learning and experimentation with natural skin care. I am very happy with the results. It is best to use raw yogurt because it lasts longer than pasteurized. It is best to use whole yogurt because the high cream content will assist in the removal of make-up, sunscreen, dirt or grease.

Pomegranate, Mint and Sauerkraut Salad

This delicious, festive salad is a great aid to digestion and perfect with kombucha marinated goose or turkey. The pomegranate ads a nice texture with a snappy pop of refreshing juice as well as a symbolic touch of new life and rebirth. A perfect solstice salad.

Pomegranate Kombucha Marinated Christmas Goose

We are fortunate in Vancouver to have a wonderful deli/restaurant in town that has amazing pastured geese available locally (Ethical Kitchen). We decided to have one for our holiday season this year and were very pleased with the results. I like geese as they are all brown meat (which is my favorite). Like ducks they have lots of fat which means that my colorful chestnut and pistachio stuffing goes really well with goose. Chestnuts can get a little dry without plenty of fat. Try this rich old fashioned pomegranate and cherry reduction for a delicious gluten-free sauce.

  • 1 medium pastured goose
  • 2 – 3 c kombucha
  • 2 cans (660mL) coconut water (optional)
  • 2 T pomegranate syrup
  • 1 orange zest
  • 7 whole cloves
  • 1/2 piece cinnamon

Fermented Hot Sauce: 2-1

My first batch of fermented hot sauce was so successful that I have two orders for more! Never one to rest on my laurels I’ve decided to experiment with the second batch.

I’m starting off with thai chili peppers again. I’ve been reading up on hot sauces and for fermentation you want to use super hot peppers. The high levels of capcaisin (the molecule that makes you burn) help keep bad bacteria at bay. I again added garlic and I’m trying the fermentation process with whole peppers this time instead of ground peppers.

Fermented Hot Sauce: Part 2

My fermented hot sauce was bubbling and brewing away in the corner for several days. It developed a little bit of white mold, which I promptly scraped off. I did notice mentions of mold in various blog posts so I didn’t worry overly much, it seems to relate to the fermentation process.

Once I felt that it was fermented enough (use your intuition) I slipped on a glove and picked through the mixture removing all of the green stems. I then dumped the mixture into a saucepan with about half a cup of white wine vinegar and let it boil for several minutes.

I put in a teaspoon of salt and then poured the whole saucepan into my blender and whizzed it up until I liked the consistency. The sauce then took another journey into the saucepan for another round of boiling while I sterilized a few little jars. I tasted it again as it boiled and decided to add a teaspoon of white sugar. This just seemed appropriate.

Fermented Hot Sauce: Part 1

I never used to like hot sauce.

That changed during my first camping trip. I was 19-years-old.

Traveling to the site with a fellow newbie girlfriend, en route we picked up a lot of beer, a 12-pack of hot dogs and a sack of buns. That was it.  We had no tent, no sleeping bags, no nothing. Just beer and hot dogs. We joined a big group of experienced campers. They had barbecues, food tents, frying pans, cooking sauces, venison, and…

Sriacha sauce. That lovely fermented garlic hot sauce, you all know it, the squirt bottle with the green lid. The symbol that you’re in a good restaurant. I mean, come on, Morimoto uses it.

Pomegranate Kombucha and Lychee Float

Delicious probiotic rich pomegranate kombucha with raw lychee ice-cream makes a delicious and nutritious gut-pleasing, taste bud tantalizing treat.

Tarragon Sauerkraut

Sauerkraut is easy to make and great for your digestion. The addition of tarragon (traditionally known as the ‘king of herbs’ in France) enhances the digestive assisting powers of kraut. Tarragon stimulates bile production among many other things (see below).

  • 1 head of cabbage, shredded
  • 1 T dried tarragon (or 2-3 T of fresh tarragon)
  • 2 T sea salt